muggleindenial28

The greatest thing you'll ever learn, is just to love and be loved in return - Moulin Rouge

691 notes

And that’s where Outlander is truly appealing to the sexuality of its straight female viewers. Instead of painting female pleasure on the male terms of the virgin/whore dichotomy, the audience is shown sex as a normal, matter-of-fact piece of the relationship puzzle. Sure, Jamie and Claire can’t get enough of each other on their wedding night, but their passion is forged by the connections made in the unhurried conversations that make up the bulk of the episode. Jamie is kind and Claire is emotionally conflicted, and their sex isn’t perfect or without fumbling. At one point in the now infamous wedding episode, Jamie stops mid-coitus to make sure he hasn’t hurt Claire. It’s a far cry from the violent thrusting and distressed shouts of a Game of Thrones sex scene.

Outlander and The Female Gaze: Why Women Are Watching 

(via maisiewilliams)

(Source: lonelysavioroftheuniverse, via maisiewilliams)

256,055 notes

im-just-a-lucky-boy:

kunaigirl:

claclalala:

This is for all you ladies out there.

the struggle is real

I have a trans man story about this.
Since I’m pre-t I still have my period but since I’m socially out as trans I use men’s bathrooms. One time at the college the family bathroom was taken and so I went into the men’s room to do my business. I tried opening the little pad as quietly as I could manage, but the rustling and ripping sound still happened. I froze in silence because I didn’t know if the other guy in the men’s room heard it or not.
Then after a little bit of silence I hear…
"Who has a bag of chips?"
And in a panic I just whisper back to him “I’m not sharing.”
Then I hear a huff before he finished his business and left.

im-just-a-lucky-boy:

kunaigirl:

claclalala:

This is for all you ladies out there.

the struggle is real

I have a trans man story about this.

Since I’m pre-t I still have my period but since I’m socially out as trans I use men’s bathrooms. One time at the college the family bathroom was taken and so I went into the men’s room to do my business. I tried opening the little pad as quietly as I could manage, but the rustling and ripping sound still happened. I froze in silence because I didn’t know if the other guy in the men’s room heard it or not.

Then after a little bit of silence I hear…

"Who has a bag of chips?"

And in a panic I just whisper back to him “I’m not sharing.”

Then I hear a huff before he finished his business and left.

(via snarkydiscolizard)

43,308 notes


"For the record, feminism by definition is: ‘The belief that men and women should have equal rights and opportunities. It is the theory of the political, economic and social equality of the sexes.’
I started questioning gender-based assumptions when at eight I was confused at being called “bossy,” because I wanted to direct the plays we would put on for our parents—but the boys were not.When at 14 I started being sexualized by certain elements of the press.When at 15 my girlfriends started dropping out of their sports teams because they didn’t want to appear “muscly.”When at 18 my male friends were unable to express their feelings.I decided I was a feminist and this seemed uncomplicated to me. But my recent research has shown me that feminism has become an unpopular word. Apparently I am among the ranks of women whose expressions are seen as too strong, too aggressive, isolating, anti-men and, unattractive.
Why is the word such an uncomfortable one?”

"For the record, feminism by definition is: ‘The belief that men and women should have equal rights and opportunities. It is the theory of the political, economic and social equality of the sexes.’

I started questioning gender-based assumptions when at eight I was confused at being called “bossy,” because I wanted to direct the plays we would put on for our parents—but the boys were not.

When at 14 I started being sexualized by certain elements of the press.

When at 15 my girlfriends started dropping out of their sports teams because they didn’t want to appear “muscly.”

When at 18 my male friends were unable to express their feelings.

I decided I was a feminist and this seemed uncomplicated to me. But my recent research has shown me that feminism has become an unpopular word. Apparently I am among the ranks of women whose expressions are seen as too strong, too aggressive, isolating, anti-men and, unattractive.

Why is the word such an uncomfortable one?”

(Source: holandroden, via onwingsmadeofwax)